Safe Use of Essential Oils

[quote align=’right’]The information provided is not intended to replace the medical directives of your healthcare provider. This information is not meant for diagnosis of health issues. If you are pregnant, have serious or multiple health concerns, consult with your healthcare provider before using essential oils. If you experience any complications or adverse reactions contact your healthcare provider.[/quote]

The use of essential oils, also known as aromatherapy, is a rapidly growing practice in the United States.  In the United States, aromatherapy is being integrated into Hospice care, nursing homes, health spas, hospitals, physical therapy practices, and private homes.

But what is aromatherapy? Aromatherapy is an ancient art and science that strives to promote the health of the body, mind, and spirit through the use of pure, naturally extracted essential oils from plant materials. Aromatherapy is a holistic practice that is employed as a preventative measure, as well as during times of acute and chronic illness or disease. As a holistic practice all areas of an individual’s life are taken into consideration; the physical, emotional, mental, spiritual, and environmental. Aromatherapy is a unique, natural, and effective approach that is compatible with traditional medical treatments, chiropractic adjustment, massage therapy, physical therapy, and mental health therapy.

Common conditions aromatherapy can assist with include: arthritic and rheumatism conditions, digestive conditions (heartburn, indigestion, colic, nausea, constipation, diarrhea), menopause (hot flashes, night sweats, emotional fluxuations, etc.), high blood pressure, low blood pressure, skin conditions (acne, psoriasis, eczema, shingles, insect bites, wounds, burns), insomnia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, neuralgia, respiratory conditions (colds, flu, asthma, bronchitis), and emotional issues (stress, depression, anxiety).

Essential oils are wonderful gifts humans have been given to treat and heal physical and emotional complaints, but they are to be used with respect. Essential oils are extracted from the flowers, leaves, fruits, seeds, resins, barks, and stems of many plants.  Essential oils are hundreds of times more potent than the plant material they are extracted from, which is due to the extraction processes used to obtain them.  Essential oils are so potent that safety measures must be observed when using them.  I often tell clients that using essential oils is a “less is more” approach, and essential oils use is similar to using rocket fuel to light your barbeque.

In recent months I have noted an alarming rate of dangerous misinformation being distributed regarding the use of essential oils. As a Registered Aromatherapist it is my mission and duty to educate the public on the best and safest practice of aromatherapy and essential oil use.  Below is a list of the precautions that MUST be taken into account when using essential oils.

  1. Never apply essential oils “neat,” which means straight out of the bottle, without diluting them with carrier oil such as jojoba, olive, grapeseed, almond oil, etc. Applying essential oils neat can result in allergic reaction, severe sensitivity, and burns. Again, I remind you of how potent essential oils are; rocket fuel to a barbeque.

I am aware practices are being taught that encourage the use of essential oils neat.  These practices instruct individuals to apply neat essential oils directly on the spine.  Often a warm moist towel is then put on the spine to help the body absorb the essential oils.  These practices are very dangerous.  I have heard stories from clients, who have used these practices, and in each case the person has been seriously burned, and in a few cases permanently scared.  In two cases the individuals developed serious allergic responses to the essential oils that required medical attention.

One case involved the application of neat essential oil to a child’s face to treat eczema.  Serious burning and blistering of the child’s skin occurred, to the degree he could not go outdoors in the sunlight for several weeks because his skin was so damaged.

  1. Always be mindful of pre-existing medical conditions, allergies, and medications when using essential oils. Know which essential oils are not recommended for certain conditions. Things to consider when using essential oils include:
  • Is the person pregnant? There are some essential oils that smell wonderful but need to be avoided during pregnancy. These oils are called “emmenagogues,” oils that promote menstrual flow.
  • Does the person have high or low blood pressure? Certain essential oils can help raise or lower blood pressure. It is important to know which oils to avoid if a person has been diagnosed with either high or low blood pressure.
  • Is there a history of estrogen dependent cancer?  Some essential oils are excellent are relieving symptoms of menopause; however, if a woman has a history of estrogen dependent cancer these same essential oils must be avoided.  Know which essential oils are phyto-estrogens, i.e. oils that are similar to estrogen.
  • Is there a history of skin cancer? All citrus essential oils, as well as angelica (Angelcia archangelica), Melissa (Melissa officinalis), and basil (Ocimum basilicum), are considered photo-sensitizing.  They enhance the effects of ultra violet rays from the sun, tanning beds, and sun lamps.
  • What prescribed medications or homeopathic medications are the person taking?  The use of some essential oils can decrease or increase the efficacy of specific prescribed medications or homeopathic remedies.  Additionally, some essential oils can increase the negative side effects of prescribed medication or homeopathic remedies.
  • What is the age of the person? Is the person an infant, child, or elderly? Infants, young children and the elderly are more sensitive to the effects of essential oils.  The amount of essential oil used for a healthy thirty year-old would be more than that recommended for babies, young children and older individuals.

• Other conditions are also affected by essential oil use.  These include epilepsy, diabetes, kidney disease, and liver disease.  It is important to know which essential oils should not be used by individuals with any one of these conditions.

  1. Do not ingest essential oils. Remember my analogy of rocket fuel to light a barbeque? Essential oils can burn mucous membranes and intestinal/stomach linings. The use of essential oils through oral ingestion can lead to the following: systemic toxicity (affecting the entire body and organs); poisoning and even death; irritation of the gastrointestinal tract; the possibility of nausea and vomiting, which will compound a client’s complaints; and undue stress on the liver. There are many effective, and safe, means of administering essential oils. I prefer to administer essential oils through inhalation, massage blends, diffusion, baths, shower scrubs, lotions, and salves.

If you are looking to incorporate essential oils into your health regimen be aware of the most safe way to do so.  Do not rely solely on the information you receive from friends and essential oil distributors.  There are wonderful reliable sources of information on aromatherapy, such as the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA) http://www.naha.org/and the Alliance of International Aromatherapists http://www.alliance-aromatherapists.org/about-us/. To find a Registered Aromatherapist in your area visit the Aromatherapy Registration Council http://aromatherapycouncil.org/

✿´´¯`•.¸¸ Haly JensenHof, MA, RA ¸¸.•´¯`´✿

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com.  I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions.

You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

Your Essential Oil First Aid Kit

As a new year begins it is time to think about starting new habits.  One of your new habits could be to always have an essential oil first aid kit ready.  There are so many essential oils to choose from, and I had to think, “If I were stranded somewhere, and wanted to have good essential oils to treat most ailments, what oils would I want to have with me?”

My list may not include essential oils you would have in your first aid kit.  I want a personalized first aid kit that best meets my family’s needs and has few essential oils that are contra-indicated for our existing medical conditions.  Despite the desire to personalize the kit you will find a list of ten essential oils I believe make a well rounded first aid kit that will work for any family.

First Aid Kit with 10 Essential Oils:

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) – I consider lavender to be the “grandmother” of all essential oils.  It is used for so many things and is useful for people between the ages of one day to one hundred years.  Lavender can be used straight out of the bottle (neat) for things like cuts, insect bites and burns. It provides help for insomnia and it is an analgesic.  Let’s not forget lavenders high level of antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiseptic properties.

Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis) – Roman chamomile is known for its ability to soothe upset stomachs and aid with sleep.  It also has analgesic properties, helps with sore muscles, muscle sprains, earaches, headaches, neuralgia, and menstrual pain. Chamomile is also good for skin conditions: acne, dermatitis, wounds, blisters, insect bites etc.  Chamomile has moderate antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiseptic properties.  It is also known as an emmenagogue, meaning it helps promote menstrual flow; therefore chamomile should be avoided during pregnancy.  A carrier oil is required for chamomile, it should not be applied neat.

Tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) – I like tea tree oil over Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) because I find it to be a very effective oil but a more gentle essential oil.  For example, eucalyptus can not be used with epileptics, during pregnancy, or with high blood pressure while tea tree can be used.  Tea tree is primarily used to combat viral, bacterial, and fungal infections as well as being a very potent antiseptic.  It is helpful in treating respiratory infections.  Tea tree can be used straight out of the bottle (neat) for things like cuts and burns, insect bites, and acne sores/boils.

Peppermint (Mentha piperita) – Peppermint is one of those essential oils that feels both warming and cooling, which is helpful when using for sore aching muscles, tired feet, and arthritic conditions.  The cooling effect of peppermint helps relieve headaches, migraine and toothache. Peppermint is also excellent for any manner of digestive issue from vomiting to constipation.  Peppermint has moderate antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiseptic properties.  A carrier oil is required for peppermint, it should not be applied neat.  Do not use in the bath.

Ravensara (Ravensara aromatica) – This oil is my “go-to” oil any time there is the hint of a sinus issue or respiratory infection.  With a few drops of ravensara in the ionic diffuser at night I can usually stop a cold in its tracks. Ravensara is also helpful used in a massage blend for overworked muscles and for lymphatic problems.  Ravensara has very high levels of antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiseptic properties.  A carrier oil is required for ravensara, it should not be applied neat.

Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) – A linen spray of geranium is used on our bedding several times a week.  Geranium has been proven to kill dust mites, which are one of the causes of allergies. Since using a geranium linen spray I have noticed our allergy symptoms have greatly decreased.  Geranium is an excellent diuretic and helps the body clear itself of toxins.  It is helps regulate the hormonal system, helping with PMS, irregularities with the menstrual cycle, menopause, and breast inflammation and congestion.  It should be avoided in women with a history of estrogen dependent cancer(s).  Geranium is also helpful in treating skin conditions because it seems to balance the production of sebum, the body’s natural oil.  Geranium has moderate antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiseptic properties.  A carrier oil is required and it should not be applied neat.

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) – Bergamot is such a happy essential oil!  Don’t let the happy and sunny scent of bergamot fool you though, it is a very effective oil.  Bergamot helps with respiratory issues, tonsillitis, cold sores, and mouth sores.  It is also great for digestive complaints.  Bergamot is a deodorant.  It helps with insomnia, eases stress, and balances emotions.  Bergamot has moderate antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiseptic properties.  A carrier oil is required and it should not be applied neat.  Bergamot is also a photo-sensitizer, meaning that it can increase the damaging effects of the sun; therefore, sunlight should be avoided after the use of Bergamot.  Do not use in the bath.

Clary sage (Salvia sclarea) – Clary sage can be a woman’s best friend, especially if that woman has entered menopause.  It is known to ease menopausal symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats, and insomnia.  Clary sage also helps with symptoms of PMS, menstrual cramps, and scanty menstrual flow.  Given all of these actions clary sage should be avoided by women who have a history of estrogen dependent cancer(s) and pregnant women.  Clary sage is very good at easing emotional tension and anxiety.  It encourages cell growth and rejuvenation and balances the production of sebum.  Clary sage is very sedating, which can help with insomnia, but it should not be used when one needs to be alert.  The use of alcohol should be limited, if not altogether stopped, as the combination of clary sage and alcohol increases drunkenness.  Clary sage should not be used by individuals with low blood pressure.

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) – In Hamlet Shakespeare has Ophelia utter these words, “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray you, love, remember.” One of the greatest actions of rosemary is its ability to stimulate the nervous system, aiding in memory and creativity.  It is a wonderful oil to diffuse when studying!  Not only is rosemary good for stimulating the nervous system it also stimulates the adrenal, digestive, and circulatory systems. Rosemary is helpful to ease the pain of sore muscles and rheumatism.  It is also helpful in treating respiratory complaints, cellulite, and inflammation.  Rosemary is not for use during pregnancy, with high blood pressure, in the bath, or when taking homeopathic remedies.  Rosemary has moderate antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiseptic properties.  A carrier oil is required and it should not be applied neat.

Sandalwood (Santalum spicatum) – Sandalwood is my favorite essential oil!  I need to add this reminder: Santalum album, what some call “true sandalwood,” is endangered and I do not purchase it due to that fact, instead I buy Australian sandalwood (Santalum spicatum).  I like the warming effect of sandalwood and often include it in massage blends for sore muscles.  Sandalwood is excellent for complaints of the urinary tract and relieving cystitis.  It is also helpful with respiratory infections, sore throat, and persistent dry cough.  Sandalwood is very calming, centering and relaxing.  It is often used during meditation and spiritual activities.  Sandalwood has moderate antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiseptic properties.  A carrier oil is required and it should not be applied neat.

Carrier oils – Several carrier oils come to mind when I think about carrier oils, but for my first aid kit I choose Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis).  It is also a stable oil, actually it is a liquid wax, with a long shelf-life.  Jojoba oil is odorless and it absorbs quickly.  Jojoba is an oil that very closely matches the sebum, the natural oil produced by our bodies, making it a good choice for all skin types.

I hope you find this information helpful in creating your own essential oils first aid kit.  May you have little need of the first aid kit in 2014.

Fragrant Blessings and good health!

The information provided is for educational purposes, and it is not intended to replace the medical directives of your healthcare provider.  This information is not meant for diagnosis of health issues.  If you are pregnant, have serious or multiple health concerns, consult with your healthcare provider before using essential oils.  If you experience any complications or adverse reactions contact your healthcare provider.   

✿´´¯`•.¸¸ Haly JensenHof, MA, RA ¸¸.•´¯`´✿

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com.  I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions.

You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

Eye Safety and Essential Oils

During the past week there have been more and more posts on the Internet about the dangers of using essential oils in the eyes.  This extremely dangerous topic has been discussed in blog postings, on the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA) web pages, privately amongst Registered Aromatherapists, and on Professional sites.  This topic has come up based on a February 12, 2013 blog post made by a Multi-level Marketing (MLM) person and other posts by MLM individuals that stem back to 2010; regardless, the issue is one that MUST be addressed for the safety of individuals who may be considering using essential oils in their eyes.  No responsible Aromatherapist or practitioner of true aromatherapy would suggest the use of essential oils in the eyes.

If you have been following my posts during the past few months you may remember that I included the avoidance of getting essential oils into the eyes as a mandatory precaution in my Essential Oil Safety Monday Musing of January 7, 2013.  I did not elaborate upon that precaution at the time; however, now seems to be the time to get the word out on my web page blog.

Do you remember when I made the analogy of essential oils as being, “similar to putting rocket fuel into your lawnmower?”  I made that statement because when the essential oils are distilled from the plant they are highly concentrated components of the plant material that are 100s of times stronger than the plant material alone.

Robert Tisserand, a highly regarded world expert in aromatherapy and essential oils, responded to this issue quiet well in his following post of 2012.  http://roberttisserand.com/2013/02/essential-oils-and-eye-safety/.

 

Haly JensenHof, MA, RA

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions. You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

 

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

 

Essential Oils during Pregnancy & a Recipe

Pregnancy is a time of joy and excitement, but it is also a time of change for a woman’s body.  Pregnancy affects a woman’s body but it also can affect her sense of smell. Some women experience a heightened sense of smell throughout their pregnancies, and this is Mother Nature’s way of helping them avoid things that could pose potential harm to them and/or their babies.  However, there are some essential oils that smell wonderful but need to be avoided during pregnancy.  These oils are called “emmenagogues,” oils that promote menstrual flow.  The following essential oils should be avoided during the entire pregnancy: Aniseed, Basil, Bay laurel, Clary sage, Clove, Cedar, Cinnamon, Cypress, Fennel, Hyssop, Juniper, Marjoram, Myrrh, Peppermint, Rose, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Wintergreen, and any other oil that is described as an emmenagogue.  The Chamomiles and Lavender are described as emmenagogues, but they can be used with care and in low dilutions (1% to 1.5%), except in the cases where an expectant mother has a history or fear of possible miscarriage.

HOW TO COMBAT NAUSEA: Nausea, especially during the first few months of pregnancy, can be quite troublesome.  If the expectant mother can tolerate the aroma of essential oils she can try to inhale Ginger, Grapefruit, Mandarin, Orange, Rosewood, or Spearmint.  I prefer to use personal inhalers, but if one is not available 1-2 drops of essential oil on a cotton ball or tissue kept in an airtight plastic bag will do the trick.  The woman can inhale from the bag periodically throughout the day.

AVOIDING STRETCH MARKS: The best way to avoid stretch marks is to try and prevent them from the very beginning.  During the fourth to fifth month of pregnancy a woman may want to use the following blend, on a regular basis, to avoid developing stretch marks on her stomach, hips, thighs, and buttocks.

Mandarin – 7 drops

Rosewood – 6 drops

Neroli – 5 drops

28.5 ml. – Sweet Almond oil

1.5 ml. – Rose hip oil

There are also methods of treating backache, heartburn, edema, hemorrhoids, and other physical changes a woman experiences during pregnancy.

Haly JensenHof, MA, RA

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions. You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

 

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

Risks of Oral Ingestion of Essential Oils

Blending

Thank you for returning to Your Health Scents website to learn more about Essential Oil Safety.

Today’s topic centers on the risks of orally ingesting essential oils.  I have been very concerned and dismayed to read on several blog sites that to take essential oils orally is safe.  On one site I saw the suggestion to take a gel cap filled with three drops of three different essential oils three times a day was perfectly safe for what the blogger “thought” might be allergies!  I don’t even want to go into the risks of self-diagnosis, the risk of allergies to the essential oils the blogger recommended be ingested, the irritation to mucous membranes said essential oils are known to cause, or the suggestion, (made by an individual untrained in clinical aromatherapy)  that taking essential oils orally is perfectly safe and acceptable. I will tell you, as a clinically Registered Aromatherapist, what I do know about what oral ingestion of essential oils can cause.

The use of essential oils through oral ingestion can lead to the following:

• Systemic toxicity (affecting the entire body and organs), poisoning, and even death.

• Irritation of the gastrointestinal tract.

• The possibility of nausea and vomiting, which will compound a client’s complaints.

• Undue stress on the liver.  Substances pass from the gastrointestinal tract to the liver for metabolism, and in the case of essential oils their therapeutic properties can become deactivated or made more toxic.

The highly respected, and leader in the field of aromatherapy, Robert Tisserand, wrote: “Oral administration is more likely to lead to systemic toxicity problems than application to the skin, since a greater concentration (about 10 times as much) is likely to reach the bloodstream.”  Additionally, Tisserand stated, “It is our recommendation that essential oils should only be prescribed orally, for therapeutic purposes, by primary care practitioners such as medical doctors and medical herbalists.”[1]

Knowing what I know about the significant dangers of oral ingestion of essential oils, I never recommend this practice to clients.  There are so many other effective, and safe, means of administering essential oils. I prefer to administer them through inhalation, massage blends, diffusion, bathing, shower scrubs, lotions, and salves.

I welcome any questions or comments.  Please send me an email, or you can find me on Facebook – facebook.com/yourhealthscents.  
Have a blessedly fragrant week!

Haly JensenHof, MA, RA

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com

 

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

 

[1] Tisserand, Robert and Caldwell, John; Essential Oil Safety, A Guide for Health Care Professionals; Churchill Livingstone; New York, NY; p. 3.

Sensitivity and How to do a Skin Patch Test

Thank you for returning to my website to learn more about Essential Oil Safety.  Today’s Musing is about a topic I am very passionate about; Applying essential oils “neat,” or straight without diluting them in a carrier oil.  In the pure or neat state essential oils are too highly concentrated to be used directly on the skin.  By putting essential oils on the skin in a neat state, allergic reactions can occur, such as irritation or sensitization.  Irritation is when the skin is exposed to a primary irritant that causes immediate symptoms, such as rash, redness, blotchiness, or even in severe cases blistering.  Sensitization is a skin reaction like that of irritation; however, it recurs every time the person comes into contact with the oil, and which symptoms become worse with every exposure.

I will give an example of sensitivity that I witnessed personally.  A friend of mine, who had no training of essential oils or essential oil safety, insisted on using neat Patchouli (Pogostemon cablin) as her signature “perfume.”  She did this daily, despite my repeated warnings and attempts to educate her on the risk factors of doing this.  I also offered her education on how she could continue to use Patchouli as her perfume by diluting it in carrier oil, but the warnings and education fell on deaf ears.  During the first week she commented on how her skin “stung” every time she applied the Patchouli.  During the second week I noticed red, inflamed spots appearing on her neck, wrists, and décolletage.  Then, during the third week she began to have a rash covering her arms and abdomen accompanied with red eyes and a runny nose.  It was finally at this stage that this friend came to me and asked what she could do to rid herself of these symptoms.  My response was simple, “Quit using Patchouli completely.”  This woman had created a situation where sensitization had occurred, and it was explained to her that she had now developed an “allergy” to her favorite essential oil, one that would become increasingly worse with each exposure to Patchouli.  This information greatly disappointed her, but she did quit using Patchouli for her perfume.  This friend also found that the spots she had from applying the essential oil neat would never go away; they created dark discolorations that have lingered years after her use of neat Patchouli oil.  Additionally, she found that every time she encountered Patchouli her eyes began to water and she began to sneeze.  Unfortunately for my friend her favorite scent is now one she can not tolerate.

I use this example every time I encounter an individual who tells me that applying essential oil neat is, “ok,” and “won’t hurt you.”  The safest practice is to dilute essential oils in carrier oil, even Lavender and Tea tree oil, to avoid developing an irritation or sensitivity.  If there is any question about how you or a client may respond to an essential oil, first do a skin patch test.

Steps to conducting a Skin Patch Test:

  1. Wash and dry the forearm with unscented soap.  I like to use Castille soap.
  2. Apply the blend to moisten, not saturate, the forearm.  The blend should consist of 1 drop essential oil in 1 teaspoon of carrier oil.
  3. Cover the forearm with sterile gauze.
  4. Leave in place for 24 hours unless irritation occurs.
  5. If any irritation occurs wash the area with unscented soap, carrier oil, or milk.
  6. After 24 hours has elapsed check for any signs of irritation/sensitization.  If no redness, rash, blotchiness, or inflammation occurs you know the chosen essential oil is safe to use in a blend.

I welcome any questions or comments please send me an email, or you can find me on Facebook on Your Health Scents page.   Have a blessedly fragrant week!

 

Haly JensenHof, MA, RA

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions. You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

 

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

Essential Oil Safety

Essential oil safety is something I am very passionate about, and given it is the start of a new year I want to start Monday Musings with this very important topic.  I tell my clients Essential oils are highly concentrated; are distilled from plant material; that less is more; and essential oils are “similar to putting rocket fuel into your lawnmower!”  Essential oils are wonderful gifts humans have been given to treat and heal physical and emotional complaints, but they are, like any medication, to be used with respect.  Below is a list of the precautions that MUST be taken into account when using essential oils.

• Do not ingest essential oils.  Remember my analogy of rocket fuel into a lawnmower?  Essential oils can burn mucous membranes and intestinal/stomach linings.

• Never apply essential oils “neat,” that is, without a carrier oil such as jojoba, olive, grapeseed, almond oil, etc. Applying essential oils neat can result in allergic reaction, severe sensitivity, and burns.

• Avoid getting essential oils into your eyes.  If you do get essential oils into your eyes flush with carrier oil, not water.

• Do not apply essential oils inside the ears.

• Always be mindful of contraindications when using essential oils.  Know which essential oils are not recommended for certain conditions. Things to consider when using essential oils include:

–       Is the person pregnant or nursing?

–       Does the person have high or low blood pressure?

–       Is there a history of estrogen cancer?

–       Is there a history of skin cancer?

–       Does the person have a history of heart disease?

–       Does the person have kidney disease?

–       What prescribed medications or homeopathic medications is the person taking?

–       Does the person have a history of epilepsy?

–       Does the person have diabetes?

–       What is the age of the person?  Are they an infant, child, or elderly?

Please join me for Monday Musings in the coming weeks as I go into further detail about many of these safety precautions.  I wish you a fragrant and blessed week.

Haly JensenHof, MA, RA

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions. You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!