Making a Fresh Potpourri

Making a fresh potpourri is a fun activity children of all ages can assist with, and it is a project that can get the entire family outdoors.  I am so fortunate to live in Wyoming, “God’s Country,” which provides me with the main ingredients needed to make a holiday potpourri.  In fact, right outside my front door, are the trees that produce the Juniper berries/sprigs and Cedar sprigs I need to create a potpourri that will fill the house with the scents of Christmas! Continue reading “Making a Fresh Potpourri”

Aromatic Autumn

I hear a lot of people comment how autumn is their favorite time of year. I can’t make that statement because I find every season is my favorite season for its own unique reasons. The reasons I like autumn include the warm, lazy, dreamy afternoons; the crisp cool nights; the vibrant colors of the leaves and the harvest of crops in preparation for winter. Continue reading “Aromatic Autumn”

Clearing the Air with Essential Oils

It has reached that time of year when I am aching to flood the house with fresh clean air; however, we are still in the grip of frigid (below zero) winter temperatures.  Simply opening the windows to allow fresh air in is not practical, but the stale air of winter; which includes the smells of wet dog, wet wool, cooking, wood fires, and people trapped indoors for too long has got to go!

In previous Monday Musings I have provided you with recipes for room sprays and blends to diffuse in your warming pots and ionic diffusers.  In fact, last year at this time I provided a Deodorizing Room Spray for the very same reason I am longing for fresh air now! Isn’t it funny how things come full circle?

I have spent the past week trying different methods of deodorizing the air in the house, and I am going to give you the results.

  1. Room  spray. Of course I have used the Deodorizing Room Spray recipe from the previous Monday Musing.  To find the recipe simply click on the link.
  2. Adding essential oils to a candle.  With this method an unscented candle is lit and allowed to burn until a nice pool of melted wax has developed.  For safety reasons, (essential oils are highly volatile) the candle is blown out and three to four drops of essential oil is added to the melted wax.  The candle is relit and the essential oils are diffused through the wick and warm wax.  Personally, I don’t care for this method of diffusing essential oils. First, I worry about the potential of fire. Second, the aroma of the essential oil is not diffused strongly enough for me.  Third, any therapeutic properties of the selected essential oil are rendered nil due to the heat of the flame. Fourth, with more effective methods of diffusing essential oils I found this method to be a waste of essential oils and money.
  3. Essential oils on electric baseboard heaters.  I have to admit I really liked the result of this method.  Yes, the heat does diminish the therapeutic properties of the essential oils, but the aroma!  Immediately the aroma of the essential oil was flooding the house, and I liked it!  I simply put three to four drops of essential oil directly onto the baseboard heater.  I am certain the same can be done with any source of radiating source of heat.
  4. Essential oils on a handkerchief/cloth placed over a forced heat source.  I did not try this method because we don’t have forced heat in our house.  In the house I grew up in we did have forced air heating, and I remember using this method in that house.  Simply place a few drops essential oil onto a cloth and place the cloth over an air vent.  The cloth allows the warmed air to flow into the room and at the same time releases the aroma of the essential oils.
  5. Essential oils on a light bulb ring.  This is a method I used daily when I worked in an office setting.  There are several types of light bulb rings: metal, ceramic, paper, and felt.  I worry about fire too much to trust a paper or felt ring, so I use a ceramic ring.  Simply place a few drops of essential oil onto the light bulb ring and place the ring onto the light bulb.  While I do like this method but again, heat diminishes any therapeutic benefit of the oil.
  6. Adding essential oils to the humidifier.  Winter tends to create very dry air conditions in the house, so we continuously run a cold water humidifier.  Our humidifier holds approximately three gallons of water, and to every gallon of water I added 20 drops essential oil.  This method works very well at continuously emitting the aroma of essential oils into the air.  Additionally, since no heat source is used the therapeutic properties of the essential oil are retained.
  7. Diffusing essential oils in an Ionic diffuser.  This is my favorite method of using essential oils to scent and cleanse the air.  If you don’t have an ionic diffuser I strongly suggest you purchase one! When I use essential oils for the purpose of making a room smell nice I also want them to help combat bacteria and viruses. An ionic diffuser does not use heat to disperse the essential oils into the air therefore the therapeutic properties of the oils are available and not diminished or rendered useless. Bonus!

If you are wondering what essential oils to use to help cleanse the air in your home, these essential oils are deodorizing, anti-viral and anti-bacterial.

Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha)                         Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia)                           Lemon (Citrus limon)

Myrtle (Myrtus communis)                              Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)

Peppermint (Mentha piperita)                         Patchouli (Pogostemon cablin)

Sandalwood (Santalum spicatum)                  Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens)

I hope we will be able to open our windows soon and allow clean fresh air to circulate into our homes.  Until the weather allows us to this try a few of these methods of using essential oils to cleanse the air in your home and let me know which one you like best.

✿´´¯`•.¸¸ Haly JensenHof, MA, RA ¸¸.•´¯`´✿

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com.  I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions.

You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

Geranium vs. Dust Mites

A leading cause of nasal allergy symptoms is dust mites.  Yep, those microscopic insects that take up residence in your bedding and furnishings can create serious allergy symptoms for some people.  Never fear!  Geranium is here!

A few years ago I wrote a research paper on the therapeutic aspects of geranium (Pelargonium graveolens), and I learned a wonderful fact.  Geranium essential oil is 100% effective at killing dust mites!  Researchers discovered geranium was just as affective at eradicating dust mites as the more commonly used benzyl benzoate and DEET compounds.  What the researchers discovered was, “at doses of 40, 20, and 10 µg/cm², the essential oils of P. graveolens gave 100% mortality against house dust mites.”[1] I found this proves to be a very small amount of essential oil to be effective, as 1 µg is the equivalent of 0.001 mg.  I don’t understand the scientific numbers and symbols either, but I loved this fact because I am quite leery of many synthetic, un-natural, and potentially harmful chemicals we are exposed to on a daily basis.  I also loved this fact because I suffer from an allergy to dust mites.

After discovering this bit of information, and putting the scientific numbers aside, I immediately created a geranium linen spray and started my own little experiment.  The linen spray was made with the following:

*2 oz. dark glass spray bottle

*12 drops Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) essential oil

*2 ml. Everclear alcohol or high grain alcohol, such as vodka

*Distilled water

I put 12 drops geranium oil in the spray bottle, added two milliliters Everclear alcohol, and topped the bottle off with distilled water.

 

 

All of our bedding was thoroughly washed on the sanitizing settings of the washing machine and clothes dryer.  After shaking the bottle vigorously, the blend was then sprayed on the mattress, freshly laundered mattress cover, pillows, sheets and blankets.   The application of the geranium spray was done twice a week, in the morning, in order to prevent it being too overpowering at bed time.  There was also the consideration that geranium is considered somewhat stimulating, and I was concerned about it being too stimulating at bed time.  Yet, at the same time geranium is also known to be balancing to the nervous system, which could help promote more restful sleep.

The results of this experiment included some very positive results.  Pelargonium graveolens did have a sedative action I found to be helpful in obtaining a good night’s sleep. Within a period of two weeks I observed that nasal congestion for both me and my husband was minimal. Within the same time frame I noted my husband’s snoring had nearly disappeared, which could be attributed to the decrease in nasal congestion.  Bonus!

I have found that by faithfully using this linen spray our nasal congestion, i.e. allergy symptoms, have greatly decreased.  We sleep better, have fewer sinus complications, and have even quit using allergy medications.  So, if you suffer from a dust mite allergy I strongly encourage you to try using this linen spray.

Wishing you a restful and dust mite free sleep!

✿´´¯`•.¸¸ Haly JensenHof, MA, RA ¸¸.•´¯`´✿

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com.  I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions.

You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

The information provided is for educational purposes, and it is not intended to replace the medical directives of your healthcare provider.  This information is not meant for diagnosis of health issues.  If you are pregnant, have serious or multiple health concerns, consult with your healthcare provider before using essential oils.  If you experience any complications or adverse reactions contact your healthcare provider.    

Resources:

[1] Jeon, Ju-Hyun, Hyung-Wook Kim, Min-Gi Kim, and Hoi-Seon Lee; (2008); Mite Control Activities of Active Constituents Isolated from Pelargonium graveolens Against House Dust Mite;Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology; 18 (10), 1666-1671.

 

 

 

Making a Lavender Sachet

A very simple and charming gift is a sachet.  A sachet is also effective and practical. This year several of my friends will be receiving lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) sachets for Christmas.  Homemade sachets are great gifts for Christmas, birthdays, bridal showers, and baby showers.

I like sachets for my lingerie drawer, pajama drawer, t-shirt drawer, and closet.  Ok, I just like sachets!  I like the simplicity of a sachet.  It is so easy to add one to any small area that needs a hint of pleasing aroma.  A sachet can even be used in the car to deodorize it; however, I don’t recommend lavender due to its calming and somewhat sedating qualities.  We need to be alert when driving.  A sachet of fresh peppermint (Mentha piperita) leaves is perfect for the car.

Making a sachet is very simple, requiring no sweat on the brow or messy glue guns!  I like simple.

Materials:

  1. Fine mesh, linen, or cheese cloth bags.  I found mine at the local craft store at the great price of four for a dollar.
  2. Approximately two cups of dried lavender flowers, which will be enough to make about eight sachets.  Lavender flowers can be purchased from several sources.  I purchased mine from Mountain Rose Herbs but most essential oil suppliers, and definitely herbal suppliers, have dried lavender.

Those are the ingredients, and that’s it!

Assembly is even easier.  I put enough lavender into each bag to make it bulge, which is approximately ½ cup. I then tighten the drawstring on the bag and done!  See, that was almost too easy.

To add just a hint of a secondary aroma I may include a cotton ball with one drop of an essential oil. For example, I have included the scent of vanilla (Vanilla plantifolia) by putting one drop of the essential oil on a cotton ball and hiding the cotton ball in the center of the bag, surrounding it by the lavender flowers.

To release the wonderful scent I rub the bag between my hands for a second, slightly crushing the lavender flowers.  This causes the lavender to release its pleasing scent.  When the scent begins to fade I will rub the sachet again and replace the sachet into my drawer.  Eventually, typically after four months, the lavender will have emitted all of the scent it possibly can, and it is then time to make a new sachet.

Have fun with this project!

Fragrant Blessings,

✿´´¯`•.¸¸ Haly JensenHof, MA, RA ¸¸.•´¯`´✿

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com.  I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions.

You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

 

Holiday Scents for the Home

Holiday scents conjure feelings of warmth, comfort, and happiness.  They also bring up memories of childhood, family, and festivities; but, did you know that holiday scents are also good for you?

Did you know that many of the natural scents we associate with the holidays also contain anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-septic, and anti-fungal properties?  So, not only do they smell good they help keep you healthy!

What aromas do you associate with the holidays?  I think of the pine scent of Christmas trees, the peppermint of candy canes, the ginger of gingersnaps, and orange for the fruit given in each child’s Christmas bag of goodies following the Christmas Eve church services.

Creating an atmosphere that gives you the warmth and wonderful memories of the season is quite easy.  I am going to share four essential oil blends that I like to diffuse in our home during the holiday season.  These recipes smell so wonderful and they help protect us, and our guests, from any viruses, bacteria, and colds that could be lurking in the air.

Each aroma blend is intended to be diffused in an ionic diffuser or in a warm simmering pot/diffuser.  I prefer an ionic diffuser over warming pots because the therapeutic properties of the essential oils are not diminished by the heat from a warm method when they are emitted.

For each aroma blend add the following essential oils to one cup of distilled water.

Christmas Tree

3 drops Pine (Pinus sylvestris) essential oil

3 drops Peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil

Ginger snaps

3 drops Orange (Citrus sinensis) essential oil

3 drops Ginger (Zingiber officinale) essential oil

Christmas Eve

4 drops Orange (Citrus sinensis) essential oil

2 drops Peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil

Warm by the Fire

3 drops Orange (Citrus sinensis) essential oil

2 drops Ravensara* (Ravensara aromatica) essential oil

2 drops Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) essential oil

The following is a list of the aromas most people associate with the holidays.  Get creative and blend your own signature aroma that helps bring you experience the cheer of the season.

Pine (Pinus sylvestris)                                                 *Orange (Citrus sinensis)

Juniper (Juniperus communis)                        *Clove (Eugenia aromatica)

*Peppermint (Mentha piperita)                                   *Cedar (Cedrus atlantica)

*Frankincense (Boswellia sacra)                                *Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha)

Ginger (Zingiber officinale)                                         *Allspice (Pimenta officinalis)

Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans)                                      *Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum)

*Indicates the essential oil has all four properties of anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-septic, and anti-fungal.

Wishing you the best the season has to offer!  

✿´´¯`•.¸¸ Haly JensenHof, MA, RA ¸¸.•´¯`´✿

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com.  I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions.

You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

Using Essential oils in the Laundry

Have you wandered down the laundry detergent aisle in the grocery store lately?  Has the overwhelming odors of the various laundry soaps and softeners nearly caused you to choke?  All of those synthetic scents are not necessary to make your laundry smell fresh.  Essential oils are natural, non-caustic, gentle, and leave your laundry smelling wonderful.

Now that it is getting colder at night we are in need of our feather duvet.  I love the duvet!  What I don’t love about the duvet is washing it.  I used to dread washing the duvet and our feather pillows because once the nasty odor of wet down entered my nose I couldn’t get it out.  The smell of wet feathers is horrible!

Essential oils to the rescue!  Instead of purchasing laundry detergent and laundry softener that are permeated with synthetic scents with names like Tahiti get-away, Lilac Lavender Lusciousness, Fresh Spring Fields, or whatever catchy sounding monikers the marketers have dreamt up, I opt for unscented soap and softeners so I can tailor the scent to my liking. When I wash the duvet I put ten to twelve drops of geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) essential oil into the fabric softener.  I have found that by using geranium essential oil when washing the duvet, or down pillows, the smell of wet feathers is gone, and the duvet smells so clean and fresh once it is dry.

I chose to use geranium essential oil on our bedding because it has been proven to dispel and kill dust mites.  Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) essential oil would be an excellent choice to use for linens because of its calming and soothing properties, which contribute to a good night’s sleep.

Nearly any essential oil, or combination of essential oils, can be used in the laundry, with possibly the exceptions of the heavier resin oils like myrrh (Commiphora myrrha), benzoin (Styrax tonkinesis), sandalwood (Santalum spicatum), etc.  These oils have the potential of being too thick and clogging the soap/softener dispensers.

The amount of essential oil you use in your laundry is a personal choice.  I don’t like my clothing, bedding, or towels to have an overly strong aroma.  I use more essential oils with bedding (10-12 drops), less with towels (8-10 drops), and even less with clothing (4-6 drops).

When washing towels I like to use essential oils that are known to be deodorants, are anti-bacterial, and anti-fungal.  Using essential oils with these three properties helps to kill the bacteria and mold, along with the accompanying sour smell, that can happen with towels.  Having a clean towel that smells faintly of pine (Pinus sylvestris), Lemon (Citrus limon), or Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) is lovely.

I don’t use essential oils when washing all of my clothing.  For example, blue jeans and work pants don’t need them.  Lingerie may need a subtle aroma of roses (Rosa damascena), blouses and casual shirts may have a hint of bergamot (Citrus bergamia), and pajamas…well, pajamas have to have the comforting aroma of lavender with a hint of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia)!

Wow!  I suddenly have the urge to do some laundry!  The use of essential oils in the wash can make laundry day much more fun and exciting.

Haly JensenHof, MA, RA

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.comThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions. You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

 

 

Catnip, it isn’t just for cats.

Every summer I get the little pleasure of hearing my husband state, “I love summer. I just don’t like the bugs!”  It is true.  Wouldn’t summer be much more enjoyable if we could spend its evenings on our patios and yards without the buzz and bite of mosquitoes?  I know gardening would be more pleasurable without having to fight off the biting gnats.  And don’t get me started on those dreadful deer and horse flies!

Keeping the biting insects away is a challenge, and we could buy the latest and greatest repellents from the leading manufacturers of such items, but I have always hesitated to do so.  First, there is the cost.  Secondly, the smell of those repellents always makes me gag and cough.  Third, just what kind of chemicals are in those things anyway?

For the past two years I have been using an insect repellent I formulated, called No More Bug Bites™, and it does a great job!  Being an individual who mosquitoes love to dine on, and having a violent reaction to every mosquito bite, I have found this blend to be the kryptonite to all manner of biting bugs.

 

In a four ounce dark glass spray bottle mix the following:

 

2 oz. Catnip (Nepeta cataria)hydrosol

1 oz. Peppermint (Mentha piperita) hydrosol

1 oz. Witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) hydrosol

10 drops Catnip (Nepeta cataria)essential oil

20 drops Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) essential oil

20 drops Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globules) essential oil

5 drops Peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil

To use, shake the bottle well and spray onto exposed areas of the skin.  This blend may also be sprayed on clothing.

Precautions: Dilute the recipe to ½ dilution for elders and children.  Do not get the spray into the eyes or mouth.

You are scratching your head and thinking, “Catnip?!,” aren’t you?  Well…yes…catnip. It isn’t just a plant used to make your feline friend go bananas.   Catnip is excellent at repelling mosquitoes, ticks, and all manner of biting bugs.  It is also effective at keeping cockroaches at bay, and now it is being studied for use at repelling termites. Catnip has been proven to be ten times more effective than DEET at repelling mosquitoes!  Now, if given the choice, I would opt for the natural, more effective catnip over a synthetic, and possibly health endangering chemical.  As an added bonus, my No More Bug Bites™ blend smells much better than the clear chemical smell of commercial insect repellents.  In time for July 4th outdoor activities, I hope my recipe will inspire you to create your own insect repellent, or you are most welcome to use my No More Bug Bite Blends™!

 

Here is to your good health, and as always, Fragrant Blessings!

✿´´¯`•.¸¸ Haly ¸¸.•´¯`´✿

For more information feel free to send me an email at yourhealthscents@gmail.com.  I welcome any questions or comments.

You can also find me on Facebook at Your Health Scents’ page, https://www.facebook.com/pages/Your-Health-Scents/127525504050409?ref=hl

 

Every summer I get the little pleasure of hearing my husband state, “I love summer. I just don’t like the bugs!”  It is true.  Wouldn’t summer be much more enjoyable if we could spend its evenings on our patios and yards without the buzz and bite of mosquitoes?  I know gardening would be more pleasurable without having to fight off the biting gnats.  And don’t get me started on those dreadful deer and horse flies!

Keeping the biting insects away is a challenge, and we could buy the latest and greatest repellents from the leading manufacturers of such items, but I have always hesitated to do so.  First, there is the cost.  Secondly, the smell of those repellents always makes me gag and cough.  Third, just what kind of chemicals are in those things anyway?

For the past two years I have been using an insect repellent I formulated, called No More Bug Bites™, and it does a great job!  Being an individual who mosquitoes love to dine on, and having a violent reaction to every mosquito bite, I have found this blend to be the kryptonite to all manner of biting bugs.

 

In a four ounce dark glass spray bottle mix the following:

 

2 oz. Catnip (Nepeta cataria)hydrosol

1 oz. Peppermint (Mentha piperita) hydrosol

1 oz. Witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) hydrosol

10 drops Catnip (Nepeta cataria)essential oil

20 drops Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) essential oil

20 drops Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globules) essential oil

5 drops Peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil

To use, shake the bottle well and spray onto exposed areas of the skin.  This blend may also be sprayed on clothing.

Precautions: Dilute the recipe to ½ dilution for elders and children.  Do not get the spray into the eyes or mouth.

You are scratching your head and thinking, “Catnip?!,” aren’t you?  Well…yes…catnip. It isn’t just a plant used to make your feline friend go bananas.   Catnip is excellent at repelling mosquitoes, ticks, and all manner of biting bugs.  It is also effective at keeping cockroaches at bay, and now it is being studied for use at repelling termites. Catnip has been proven to be ten times more effective than DEET at repelling mosquitoes!  Now, if given the choice, I would opt for the natural, more effective catnip over a synthetic, and possibly health endangering chemical.  As an added bonus, my No More Bug Bites™ blend smells much better than the clear chemical smell of commercial insect repellents.  In time for July 4th outdoor activities, I hope my recipe will inspire you to create your own insect repellent, or you are most welcome to use my No More Bug Bite Blends™!

 

Here is to your good health, and as always, Fragrant Blessings!

Haly JensenHof, MA, RA

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions. You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

 

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!

Room Diffusers for Essential Oils

 

One of the most easy and pleasant methods of using essential oils is to diffuse them into the air.  Diffusing essential oils into the air releases thousands of oxygenating molecules and negatively charged ions. Diffusing essential oils creates a pleasant environment, improves the air quality in the room, improves mental clarity and alertness, and can help with respiratory conditions such as colds, flu, and those relating to viruses, and fungi.

There are several types of diffusers and today I am going to give a brief explanation of each type of diffuser.  The first type I will mention is an Ultrasonic Diffuser, which is my personal favorite due to safety factors (no flames required), the length of time the diffuser will emit essential oils into the air, the ease of cleaning, and the automatic shut off feature (I always forget to shut things off or blow out candles).

Ionic or Ultrasonic Diffusers – Far superior to other diffusers they use no heat or air pumps which can seriously damage the chemistry/therapeutic properties of essential oils. Using ultrasonic “cold mist” technology, (high frequency sound) the ultrasonic diffuser generates patterns of movement that create “sonic bubbles” in the water in the diffuser’s bowl. When these bubbles implode, nano-droplets of water are released from the surface. Each tiny water droplet is enveloped by a fine coating of essential oil as they float up into the air and rapidly become part of the atmosphere of your room. You can diffuse such small amounts of essential oil that the aroma is barely perceptible, but even at such low concentrations, you can still benefit from the therapeutic effects of essential oils.  You can also diffuse larger amounts of essential oil to create a very scent filled atmosphere, mood, or energy into the room.

Nebulizing Diffuser – This type of diffuser works in a manner similar to the Ultrasonic diffuser, but it only uses essential oils without the addition of water.  Only the smallest molecules of the essential oil are dispersed through the glass baffles of the nebulizer, while larger molecules are returned to the well to be broken down into smaller molecules. Many authorities state that using a Nebulizing Diffuser is the best way to receive the full physical benefits of essential oils, but I believe the Ultrasonic diffuser is just as effective.  If allowed to stand with resinous essential oils (sandalwood, cedar, benzoin) for a few days, the oils might thicken because of exposure to air. If you have allowed the oils to become thick and sticky you will need to remove the glass nebulizer and silicon tube from the motor/base and stand in rubbing alcohol or Everclear.  This will clean out any oil residue, but cleaning is a chore!

Tea Light Diffuser – This type of diffuser is most common, and personally, the one that scares me the most.  I worry about tea lights causing fires.  Like I said earlier, I get so busy running around and doing that I forget to blow out the candle!  If this is the type of diffuser you already own for scented waxes it may be a good choice to start out with when you graduate to diffusing essential oils.  This type of diffuser uses heat to evaporate the essential oils into the air, completely negating the therapeutic properties of the oils.  But this method does make the room smell nice, and there is a wide variety of beautiful shapes and forms of tea light diffusers.

Car diffusers – These handy little dashboard diffuser plug into a cigarette lighter or cell phone charger and gently warm the essential oils dropped onto it. They are reported to be an ideal way to both freshen the car, and keep the driver alert and focused; however, the oils are warmed and evaporated into the atmosphere, which negates the therapeutic properties of the essential oils.  These little diffusers have cellulose pads where the essential oils are dropped on to, and they allow for easy change of scents.   It is recommend that essential oils that are mood elevating and reviving are used, nothing too relaxing because you don’t want the driver falling asleep! The various mint oils are stimulating and helpful for car sickness, while the conifers (pine and cypress) can relieve stress without putting the driver to sleep. Lemon would be a good choice among the citrus oils.  I tend to opt for a cotton ball or tissue with a few drops of essential oil in the car.  In the summer months I stick it over the vent for the air conditioner, and in the winter I put it on the floor under the driver’s seat.

I hope the diffuser explanations help you decide which choice is best for you.  I think I am going to get a cup of tea and enjoy the diffused oils of tea tree, ravensara, and cinnamon I have chosen to help me combat a cold!

Have a blessedly fragrant week!

Haly JensenHof, MA, RA

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact me at yourhealthscents@gmail.com This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . I welcome any questions, comments or suggestions. You can also find me on Facebook at facebook.com/yourhealthscents

 

Fragrantly helping you achieve health and well being!